It Helps to Carefully Read Analyst Reports Before Including Them in an Appeal to Authority

Carefully read analyst opinion before adding it to a sales presentation built around an appeal to authority. We almost made the mistake of pouring some comments published by Gartner, Inc. in its Highlights From Gartner’s Data-Driven Marketing Survey, 2013.

After a careful review of the material we decided the conclusions reached were not applicable to our target market — early stage Independent Software Vendors (ISVs). Here’s an example: “A majority of marketers that we interviewed, 54%, invest in digital marketing because they believe it’s key to their competitiveness. But they are not certain of the return on their investment. For that survey, which took place in April 2012, we interviewed 98 marketing executives in companies with revenue greater than $1 billion, and who had or were considering a digital marketing function.” (quoted from Gartner, Inc. A link to the full report has been provided above).

Our market is not characterized by ” . . . companies with revenue greater than $1 billion.” The companies in our market do not ” . . . invest in digital marketing because they believe it’s key to their competitiveness.” They invest in digital marketing because most of them sell software as a service (SaaS) solutions. Almost all of the revenue they produce is the result of online sales and marketing.

So what’s the big deal? The big deal is how we got to this report. We followed a link from an innocuous sentence on a web page on the IT World, Canada website: “Many organizations are plagued by disconnected analytic efforts, according to research firm Gartner Inc.”.

Note the hyperbole in the sentence. There are comparatively not ” . . . [m]any organizations . . . ” with revenue over $1Bil. The survey conducted by Gartner, Inc. speaks to a very small segment of businesses here in the United States.

Opting to include information actually unrelated to a subject at hand in an “appeal to authority” substantially diminishes the effectiveness of the appeal. Sad to say a lot of the argumentation we read today is hastily put together with information actually irrelevant to the discussion at hand.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2013 All Rights Reserved

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