9
Mar

Android remains a difficult opportunity for Google to successfully manage

2-Color-Design-Hi-Res-100px-widthGoogle recently announced its intention to proceed with a wireless data service. The latest spin on this decision, exemplified by an article published on the Wall Street Journal web site on March 8, 2015, takes this step as an indicator of a new, more frugal Google. But seen from a different angle it looks like an aggressive shot at Google’s partners in the Android alliance.

The title of the Journal article is Google: The Value of Thrift. The piece was written by Dan Gallagher and points to some recent steps taken by Google, which Gallagher presents as evidence of real follow through on points made during their most recent Quarterly earning report. Gallagher writes about the report: “Google hinted that it might curb its spending after a year in which capital expenditure surged 49% to nearly $11 billion.”

Gallagher finds an important example of this new campaign, at work, in some public announcements from Google about their decision to go forward as a wireless data provider. Gallagher notes “The Wall Street Journal also reported that the [wireless service to be offered by Google] will be limited to customers using Google’s own Nexus phones, which make up only a small portion of the overall Android market.”

But if I were the President of Samsung, or LG, or any other of Google’s partners in the Android mobile O/S effort, I don’t think I would be too pleased to learn the team managing the overall Android stack has just now decided to debut a promising wireless data effort (to deliver high quality/very high speed wireless data services from pipes supplied by T-Mobile, Sprint and more) for only its own phones. Why not mine too? I venture this phrase bounced around a few conference rooms when the news of this plan broke during Mobile World Congress 2015.

In my opinion this move is simply the latest in a series of steps likely to cause more headache for Google than anything else. The real sore spot, of course, is the damage a self-serving deal like this one can wreak on a very important recent effort on Google’s part to improve its penetration of the enterprise computing market. Certainly Android partners like Samsung are critically important to the success of this effort. Research has demonstrated enterprise IT organizations look at the Samsung Android device platform as one of, if not the only, line of Android devices worth serious consideration for an enterprise rollout. So why leave them out in the cold on this one?

It’s hard for me to get behind Google’s “moon shots” when they stumble around as they appear to have done on this one.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2015 All Rights Reserved

9
Dec

Hadoop attracts support from Microsoft and Intel

The Apache Hadoop project “develops open-source software for reliable, scalable, distributed computing” (quoted from the “What is Apache Hadoop?” section of the site). So it makes sense for Microsoft and Intel to enthusiastically support the project. Microsoft is deeply committed to its cloud, IaaS effort, Azure, and one of the prime revenue generators for Intel is its Data Center Business. Azure and Intel’s Data Center business are both all about lots and lots of computer servers. The former consumes servers, while the latter provides the CPUs driving them.

As I wrote in the previous post to this blog, it’s likely a majority of the enterprise consumer segment of the tech reader community maintains a questionable understanding of the notion of “big data”. But, when correctly understood, it should not be a stretch for readers to understand why the Apache Hadoop project (or its OpenStack competitor) are positioned at the very core of this technology trend.

Microsoft and Intel are not the only mature ISVs looking to benefit from big data. IBM and EMC are two other champions with solutions on the market to add value for enterprises looking to implement Hadoop.

Intel ostensibly understands the ambiguity of the notion of “big data”, and the imperative of providing the enterprise business consumer with a clearer understanding of just what this buzzword is really all about. A section of the Intel web site, titled Big Data, What It Is, Why You Should Care, and How Companies Gain Competitive Advantage is an attempt to provide this information.

But Intel’s effort to educate the consumer, in my opinion, falls into the same swamp as a lot of the other hype before it can deliver on its promise. The amount of data may be growing exponentially, as the opening of the short Intel animation on the topic contends, but there are a lot of mature ISVs (Oracle, IBM, Microsoft, etc) with relational database management systems, designed for pricey big server hardware, which are capable of providing a columnar structure for the data.

Even when “unstructured data” is mentioned, the argument is shaky. there are solutions for enterprise consumers like Microsoft SharePoint (specifically, The Term Store service), which are designed to build a method of effectively pouring text data into an RDBMS, for example SQL Server (the terms are added to SQL Server and are used to tag the text strings identified in unstructured data).

I am not arguing for the sole use of traditional RDBMSs, with SQL tools to manage a data universe experiencing exponential growth. Rather, I think big data proponents (and Hadoop champions) need to perform a closer study on what the real benefits are of clustering servers and then articulate the message for their enterprise computing audience.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

27
Mar

Open Source ISVs are Not Immune to Market Migration to Cloud Computing Options

On March 25, 2013, the US stock brokerage firm Raymond James downgraded Red Hat to “Market Perform”. The reasons for the downgrade included:

  • Signs of diminishing interest, from enterprise business, in the Red Hat Linux system, and,
  • Conversely, signs of greater interest in cloud computing alternatives from the same market

Red Hat will not report quarterly earnings until Wednesday, March 27, 2013. If the analysts at Raymond James are correct, the likely drop in revenue at Red Hat will signal a new freedom for enterprise business. In 2013, the costs associated with maintaining an on premises data center are no longer mandatory. On premises data centers present the most security method of enterprise computing, but elastic services like Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure are too compelling, from a cost perspective, for enterprise businesses to any longer ignore.

Improvements in virtualization technology are also likely drivers of this new direction. Products that not only virtualize servers, but also networks, themselves, promise substantial reductions in the cost of operating computing infrastructure. Early stage ISVs with solutions that contribute to the cost savings enterprise businesses can realize by implementing as much virtualization as possible are looking at a promising future.

Red Hat sells all of the components enterprise businesses require to build private and even public cloud services, but stops short of offering to host cloud efforts. Their web site promotional content looks to us a lot like what we used to see at VMware. But VMware has radically changed their message on this subject. Cloud products and services are prominently featured on their web site. They’ve even included a video presentation from Gartner on the topic to add authority to their message. Red Hat is likely to follow along the same path. Don’t be surprised if shortly you find a much larger section on cloud computing on the Red Hat web site, along with a new hosted services offer.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2013 All Rights Reserved