Office 365 Subscription Plans Evolve Into a Promising Revenue Opportunity for Microsoft

During Microsoft’s most recent quarterly earnings conference call numerous references were made by Amy Hood, CFO, and, I believe, Satya Nadella, CEO to Microsoft’s Cloud business proceeding at an annual run rate of $4.4 Billion USDs. This is a substantial number. Facebook’s annual run rate, per their latest 10Q as filed with the US SEC is approximately $12 Billion USDs. Google’s entire “Other” product revenue segment produced $1.6 Billion USDs for the latest quarter, only 9% more than the run rate Microsoft is claiming for its cloud offers (mostly Azure and Office 365).

The rate at which Office 365, specifically, is developing into a promising revenue opportunity for Microsoft should not be underestimated. We have first hand experience with the cost realities. We maintain an Office 365 E3 plan and a Dynamics CRM Professional plan. These combined plans are costing us $90 USDs per month. Assuming we are simply one of literally hundreds of thousands of SMB customers, one can quickly get a grasp as to how large the potential market is for Microsoft for this offering.

But it gets better. One of the most highly promoted features of Office 365, and the basis for a lot of the editorial content enfusing Satya Nadella’s recent presentations, has to do with Business Intelligence (BI) and Analytics. We purchased an Office 365 E3 plan in order to leverage some of these features, for example, SQL Server Reporting Services for SharePoint, and Excel Services for SharePoint. But Power BI, which includes Power Map, Power Q&A, etc, is now an extra cost add on service, which we will need to pay for. At a listed cost of $40 per user per month, we are looking at an almost 50% increase in our monthly subscription cost to add the service.

Are the benefits worth the expense? The answer will, of course, vary from customer to customer. But, for any SMB in a regulated industry, or any SMB doing business with larger companies with an appetite for BI reports, the answer will likely be yes.

Microsoft’s principal competitor for this type of service is IBM. To the best of our knowledge, Google has nothing close.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

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