Google Debuts Cloud Dataflow at Google I/O 2014

2-Color-Design-Hi-Res-100px-widthAt the end of a 2.5 hr plus webcast of the Keynote Presentation from Google I/O 2014 can be found the debut of Google Cloud Dataflow, the replacement for Google MapReduce. Readers unfamiliar with MapReduce, but avidly interested in the big data enterprise computing trend, need to understand MapReduce as the application at the foundation of today’s Apache Hadoop project. Without MapReduce, the Apache Hadoop project would not exist. So Google MapReduce is a software package worth some study, as is Cloud Dataflow.

But wait, there’s more. As Urs Hölze, Senior Vice President, Technical Infrastructure, introduces Google Cloud Dataflow, his audience is also informed about Google’s role in the creation of another of today’s biggest enterprise data analytics approaches — NoSQL (“Not only SQL”). He casually informs his audience (the segue is a simple “by the way”) Google invented NoSQL.

I hope readers will get a feel for where I’m headed with these comments about these revelations about Google’s historical role in the creation of two of the very big trends in enterprise computing in late 2014. I’m perplexed at why Google would, literally, bury this presentation at the very end of the Keynote. Why would Google prefer to cover its pioneering role in these very hot computing trends with a thick fog? Few business decision-makers, if any, will be likely to pierce this veil of obscurity as they search for best-in-class methods of incorporating clusters of servers in a parallel processing role (in other words “big data”) to better address the task of analyzing text data scraped from web pages for corporate sites (“NoSQL”).

On the other hand, I’m also impressed by the potential plus Google can realize by removing this fog. Are they likely to move in this direction? I think they are, based upon some of the information they reported to the U.S. SEC in their most recent 10Q filing for Q3 2014. Year-over-year, the “Other Revenues” segment of Google’s revenue stream grew by 50% from $1,230 (in 000s) in 2013, to $1,841 in 2014. Any/all revenue Google realizes from Google Cloud and its related components (which, by the way, include Cloud Dataflow) are included in this “Other Revenues” segment of the report. For the nine months ending September 30, 2014, the same revenue segment increased from $3,325 in 2013, to $4,991 in 2014. Pretty impressive stuff, and not likely to diminish with a revamped market message powering “Google at Work”, and Amit Singh (late of Oracle) at the head of the effort.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

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