Look for even more feature hype as ISVs present new features somehow failing to reach consumers as promised

In an earlier post to this blog, titled Enterprise IT ISVs Contributed to the Bloated Feature Set for PCs this writer published comments about how the very close relationship between Intel and Microsoft, which first began, one can argue, when IBM turned over the chip manufacturing pieces of the original PC to Intel, actually worked to the disadvantage of both parties. The outcome of this mismatch of efforts was, we argued, the Complex Instruction Set Computing (CISC) hardware architecture, which covered far too many bases to successfully compete with its Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) rivals. The RISC machines won the contest. The mobile device world is filled with small, smart devices built to conform to RISC architecture principals.

Now, in late 2014, we think it would be better, (and consumers would, ultimately, benefit more) if hardware, firmware, and software all actually worked closer together. Unless/until these players warm up to each other, devices are simply not going to work as advertised. Marketing communications messaging about new features will simply devolve into just more hype.

Over the last several posts to this blog we’ve presented some examples we’ve found of this problem eating away at some of the opportunities computing hardware consumers may hope to enjoy from their purchase decisions:

  1. Solid State Drives, purchased after market, do not work well with Intel PCs running Microsoft’s Windows O/S.
  2. Android devices, at least from Samsung, can’t be upgraded to new versions (for example, a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1, 2.1, requires a “root canal” if a consumer wants to avail of the new KitKat or Lollipop O/S, and chuck JellyBean).
  3. A new Apple iOS O/S is made available to older iPhones and iPads, but performs poorly once it is installed; consumers suspect they have been hoodwinked into downloading and installing the new O/S as a means of pushing a new hardware sale.
  4. Finally, Personal Assistants aren’t equipped to understand complex verbal linguistics, and fail to work in high demand situations. Bi-Directional voice conversations don’t sync well with hands free bluetooth audio in cars

This list could go on for quite a while.

In this writer’s opinion, ISVs will do better to either completely abandon the notion of an after-market for new hardware products, or work closer together, perhaps via standards committees, etc.

But there is nothing on the horizon pointing to either of these events happening any time soon. For now, consumers are simply better off researching very carefully each nuance of any planned changes before embarking on them.

Ultimately ISVs will likely suffer more than consumers from this condition.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

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