Can a set of entirely positive market comments endanger the revenue stream health of a tech hardware business?

Apple’s September 9, 2014 new products debut has magnetized an almost entirely positive set of market comments. But can such a set of editorial content actually work against Apple? The lopsided set of positive, almost glowing market commentary about the iPhone 6, 6S, iWatch, and iPay reaches a pinnacle, of sorts, in a piece written by Tiernan Ray, which was published by Barrons on September 16, 2014. The title of this article is Apple: Don’t Listen to the Doomsayers. Even Ray’s decision to include a contrarian opinion expressed by Doug Kass of Seabreeze Partners in his bucket of “doomsayers”, in this writer’s opinion, exemplifies the excessive weight of positive opinion about these new products, and what they promise to bring to Apple.

So, to answer the question posed in the title of this post, we certainly hold the opinion an almost unanimously positive market reception for a set of comparatively very expensive products like these from Apple, can be dangerous to the financial health of the ISV producing them. It is simply not tenable, in this writer’s opinion, to assume Apple will be able to pay for the very high market capitalization it presently enjoys by continuing to focus on the top of the consumer market for these devices. Regardless of whether the cost of purchasing an iPhone 6S is subsidized by a carrier here in the US, or a consumer ends up paying outright to purchase one, a $199.00 street price is not reflective of the TRUE cost of acquiring the product.

The US market is trained to react positively to offers fueled with artificially low prices. Not so the rest of the world, and, especially not so in emerging markets. These other locales and communities of consumers are not likely to line up to buy either of these smart phones anytime soon. These products will only be available, at launch, in a basket of countries, and, in this writer’s opinion, for good reason. Average global consumers simply cannot afford these devices.

What is even more troubling about the editorial euphoria bubbling up around these devices and the debut, as a marketing communications piece in its own right, is the complacency expressed by what is referred to as the “mainstream media”, here in the U.S. on the question of whether average consumers here in the US will have the fortitude to make rational decisions about whether or not it makes sense to purchase one of the products.

One popular publication ran a headline something like this: “Like it or not, Wearables are Here to Stay”. Have we really reached the age of “solution without a problem” on steroids? This writer does not think so. If consumers do not need wearable tech, then they won’t buy devices in the category. Certainly, different consumer segments exhibit different needs, but all this talk will have to evolve into buying action before we can really be convinced a shift in consumer sentiment has occurred.

Bottom line: the old adage “too much of a good thing” speaks the truth. It will be interesting to gauge results a quarter or two down the road.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

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