When features reverberate from product to product, consumers are likely to become indifferent while markets take the on ramp to commodities

Over the last year, or more, the same computing hardware feature set — very thin portable computers with ultra sharp displays, light weight, and rapid boot times — has reverberated across devices from different manufacturers targeted to the same market. This type of condition is a harbinger of product marketing producing commodities, leaving little room for brand differentiation. It’s time product marketers did their homework. Consumers are not likely to be lulled into complacency and just continue buying new versions of devices they already own.

Apple’s recent debut of the “new” iPad Air 2 is a case in point. The web site promotion for this device emphasizes features already claimed by Apple competitors, principally Microsoft, for its Surface Pro 3 2-in-1 computing devices.

But if I’m someone who recently bought a Surface Pro 3, does Apple product marketing really believe I’m going to chuck my investment of somewhere between $1 and $2K, or more, to buy yet another product claiming to be the thinnest device ever? If they do, I’m afraid they’re not likely to successfully achieve their objective. As Dr. Michael Porter has illustrated, competition to be the best is a comparatively low profit, zero sum game.

What the Apple iPad Air 2, and Microsoft Surface Pro 3 MARCOM illustrates is a disconnect between personal computer product marketing and its targeted customer base. To be fair, the video included with Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 debut did include several portraits of how customers are actually using the first and second generations of Microsoft’s Surface. Post Surface Pro 3 launch, Apple purchased a series of online ads, which were displayed on the New York Times web site, providing much of the same information about organizations using iPad tablets. But connecting with your customers and coming to market with inherently unique products, which, in turn, deserve a fitting MARCOM statement conveying what’s unique, and different about them, is something altogether separate from a set of portraits of how customers are using your light, very bright, and thin ultra portable personal computers.

Actually, connecting with customers, as a short video presentation titled Managing the Uncertainty of Innovation illustrates, is the kind of high-value activity early stage ISVs can and should use to mine for truly unique product notions.

No doubt the iPad Air 2 has some truly unique capabilities, which can be compelling for a specific audience/market, but the current promotion about the product isn’t getting this message across. The same opinion covers current promotional efforts for the Surface Pro 3, and even very high ticket software — Microsoft’s Delve, IBM’s Watson, and Salesforce.com’s entry into the same space.

Bottom line: “the same space” is a mirage. No two “spaces” are ever the same. Product marketers need to find out just what “space” they want to target and then go for it.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

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