1
Feb

Participating in Discussion Group Topics can Drive Not Only Engagement but Sales

In contrast to creating and moderating discussion groups on social media, dedicating lead generation personnel to monitor discussion groups, and, where relevant to reply to topics posted by other participants can be very productive. In fact, not only can this type of online dialogue stimulate response, and, thereby, engagement, but, more, this type of online dialogue can actually produce sales opportunities.

Roughly speaking, at least two criteria must be met in order for this tactic to produce positive results. The first of these criteria relates to an assessment of whether, or not, the discussion group in question is designed as a self-help forum, where the expectation is that any advice will be provide at no charge. There are, in fact, lots of these groups online. Usually they exist to support users grappling with specific technology, for example, LINUX, or other open source software. We don’t see a meaningful return on the time that will need to be invested in monitoring topics of conversation within these discussion groups.

On the other hand, where discussion groups exist to support proprietary applications, it certainly makes sense to monitor conversation topics. Spending some time each working day to quickly review abstracts of discussions can certainly produce useful opportunities to at least engage with a target audience for one’s market. Opportunities are very likely to arise where participants have already acknowledged an interest in identifying 3rd parties for specific tasks. In our experience, participants will often post a query like this on the expectation that any resources that may be identified will, in fact, be recommended resources, for which some first hand references may be forthcoming, upon request.

Nevertheless, in order to obtain true benefit from the time and effort it takes to participate in one of these topics, personnel selected for this type of product promotional task must be credible representatives with a legitimate right to participate in the topic discussions that may arise. Usually credibility can only be established for personnel who are actually involved, as users, of the technologies that often provide the basis for these discussions. Therefore, we think it makes a lot of sense for businesses to train operational personnel to perform some rudimentary prospect qualification should an opportunity arise where it makes sense to participate in a topic of discussion.

We should note that where personnel are clearly selected from a sales team, we have had rather poor results from this tactic. In part, we attribute these poor results to a “self help for free” style which characterized some of the discussion groups where our personnel have attempted to participate in discussions.

In the next post of this blog we will start to look at the passive aspects for these same methods.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2013 All Rights Reserved

30
Jan

Moderating Discussion Groups can Provide Businesses with a Means of Driving Engagement

Electronic discussion groups have been around for quite a while, and certainly predate the world wide web and the Internet as we know it in 2013. Usenet provided a realm of data communications over the Internet prior to the advent of the world wide web. The type of data communicated over Usenet amounted to a near real time exchange of information between human beings over computer terminals, on topics of interest. Highly sophisticated examples of Usenet were to be found on AOL, Compuserve, etc.

Now, in 2013, Usenet is very much history. Nevertheless, the same discussion groups that provided the reason for data communications across Usenet in the past are ubiquitous today. Almost every example of social media offers a discussion group feature. One method of using discussion groups is to build one around a topic, typically a topic that is relevant to one’s products or services, and then to provide the moderation service required to manage the group. As early as in the mid 1990s it became apparent that group moderation was a necessary activity, as the amount of promotional information disguised as discussion group topics became excessive. If left exposed to this topic abuse, without moderation, most of these discussion groups became ineffective as a method of driving legitimate engagement with an audience.

Not much has changed today. We participate in a number of these groups on behalf of clients and for our own purposes to drive business development for IMB Enterprises, Inc. We see the same topics repeated from group to group, and, further, the same group participants doing much of the topic posting. Therefore, in our opinion, if discussion groups are to be successful, businesses must plan on a substantial effort to moderate them, for, potentially, little return in the form of truly useful engagement.

Further, we think that discussion groups, as a tactic to drive engagement, also are susceptible to the problems that often plague other similar methods. These groups can, in fact, become no more than a hang out for customers and prospects looking for free information on a topic, or technology. Once again, skilled group moderation is required to ensure that the flow of conversation does not, unknowingly veer into the freeware area. If one’s product is open source software, freeware discussions may be fine, but the same is not the case for companies with proprietary products and/or services.

We cannot claim much success, at all, moderating discussion groups that produced productive engagement. On the other hand, we are certain that some experts can deliver excellent results from this method, but we think the skill is highly specialized.

In the next post to this blog we will discuss posting to discussion groups as a wholly separate method of driving engagement.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2013 All Rights Reserved