9
Jan

Intel establishes a position in the Android tablet market

2-Color-Design-Hi-Res-100px-widthOn February 19, 2002, Microsoft and Intel announced a “Wireless Development Initiative” at the 3GSM World Congress. The Congress, in 2002, was held in Cannes, France. Now, nearly 13 years later, Intel has established itself as one of the premier chip manufacturers for one segment of the mobile device market – tablet computers.

An Intel® Atom Z3580 CPU powers Dell’s new Venue 8 7000 tablet computer. This tablet also includes Intel’s RealSense R200 SnapShot camera. Readers can learn more about this new camera technology on Intel’s website. The operating system is Android 4.4 KitKat. This Dell tablet has an MSRP of $399.00, with 16GBs of storage, 2GBs or RAM and an 8.4″ OLED HD screen (2560×1600 resolution).

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal website published a review of the Dell tablet. The review was written by Joanna Stern. She really liked the device. Readers should note Stern has yet to come to the same conclusion with regard to Microsoft’s Surface 3, at least as I read her opinion. So winning a “like” from Stern is no small feat.

But the Dell tablet is not the only example of Intel’s penetration of this market segment. Lenovo is using another Intel Atom processor, the 3745, to power a tablet in the sub $200 MSRP range, the Lenovo TAB S8. The Lenovo tablet also runs on Android 4.4 KitKat O/S and offers an 8″ HD screen (1920×1200 resolution) and 2GBs of RAM. HP is also offering Android tablets powered by the same Intel Atom CPU technology.

Intel has provided incentives for its OEMs to produce devices running on Intel technology. Mention has been made of these incentives in the most recent Intel earnings conference call. Intel has also announced it will implement a new way of reporting on its business activity in this market. Mobile administration, marketing and sales costs will be rolled into its PC device business, as Aaron Tilley reported in Forbes last November, in an article titled Intel Is Combining Its PC And Mobile Units As The Lines Between The Two Blur.

In my opinion the negative analyst reaction to this announcement, and, in fact, the overall analyst impression of just how much effort Intel has invested in this activity, to date, is overstated. The fact is they are now winning at the effort, which, going forward, should be very good news.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2015 All Rights Reserved

25
Aug

Has Microsoft Alerted Media As To Its Target Market And Its Niche for Windows Phone?

A recent review of a new HTC One, this one running the Windows Phone 8.1 O/S, points to more work for Microsoft Public Relations (PR).

The title of this review is HTC One for Windows: Another Great Phone You Probably Won’t Buy. The writer is Joanna Stern, and the publication is the online Wall Street Journal.

Readers unable to read the entire article are encouraged to watch the 3 minute video embedded in the article. Why the writer would choose Time Square as a fair location to collect a sample of public opinion as to the popularity of Windows Phone (or the lack of it) eludes this writer. But, to give Stern the benefit of the doubt, perhaps someone in Microsoft’s PR team has identified mass market smart phone consumers as the target market for the Windows Phone 8.1 O/S.

If this is the case (and one must ask, with so many of these “reviews” producing nothing more positive than “it’s a great phone, but no one will buy it”, over and over again) then someone at Microsoft should take corrective action to ensure PR communicates the right message to the media.

In this writer’s opinion, the target market for a comparatively expensive smart phone like the HTC One, with the Windows 8.1 O/S, is enterprise business users (inclusive of the “fringe” created by the consumerization of IT and the BYOD structures enterprise businesses have constructed to support it). After all, what’s a tourist in Times Square going to do with Office? Office 365? Enterprise Search (for which Cortana will play a big role)? Yammer?

One can argue these consumers will be attracted to the camera on the phone, but the camera is not one of the “mission critical” features of this smart phone. The Apps we just mentioned, and to name but one more, Remote Desktop Connection, make up the solution for the burning need this target market has for the Windows Phone. In this writer’s opinion, making the rounds of mass media every time a new feature is added to the Windows Phone O/S, or even to inform them about the debut of the Surface Pro 3, only serves to render Microsoft’s products something less than what they ought to be.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved