9
Jan

Intel establishes a position in the Android tablet market

2-Color-Design-Hi-Res-100px-widthOn February 19, 2002, Microsoft and Intel announced a “Wireless Development Initiative” at the 3GSM World Congress. The Congress, in 2002, was held in Cannes, France. Now, nearly 13 years later, Intel has established itself as one of the premier chip manufacturers for one segment of the mobile device market – tablet computers.

An Intel® Atom Z3580 CPU powers Dell’s new Venue 8 7000 tablet computer. This tablet also includes Intel’s RealSense R200 SnapShot camera. Readers can learn more about this new camera technology on Intel’s website. The operating system is Android 4.4 KitKat. This Dell tablet has an MSRP of $399.00, with 16GBs of storage, 2GBs or RAM and an 8.4″ OLED HD screen (2560×1600 resolution).

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal website published a review of the Dell tablet. The review was written by Joanna Stern. She really liked the device. Readers should note Stern has yet to come to the same conclusion with regard to Microsoft’s Surface 3, at least as I read her opinion. So winning a “like” from Stern is no small feat.

But the Dell tablet is not the only example of Intel’s penetration of this market segment. Lenovo is using another Intel Atom processor, the 3745, to power a tablet in the sub $200 MSRP range, the Lenovo TAB S8. The Lenovo tablet also runs on Android 4.4 KitKat O/S and offers an 8″ HD screen (1920×1200 resolution) and 2GBs of RAM. HP is also offering Android tablets powered by the same Intel Atom CPU technology.

Intel has provided incentives for its OEMs to produce devices running on Intel technology. Mention has been made of these incentives in the most recent Intel earnings conference call. Intel has also announced it will implement a new way of reporting on its business activity in this market. Mobile administration, marketing and sales costs will be rolled into its PC device business, as Aaron Tilley reported in Forbes last November, in an article titled Intel Is Combining Its PC And Mobile Units As The Lines Between The Two Blur.

In my opinion the negative analyst reaction to this announcement, and, in fact, the overall analyst impression of just how much effort Intel has invested in this activity, to date, is overstated. The fact is they are now winning at the effort, which, going forward, should be very good news.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2015 All Rights Reserved

18
Nov

Continuing a Comparison of Cortana and OK Google for queries likely to be popular with mobile users

Getting driving directions is likely to be a very common need for mobile computing. I used Cortana and OK Google to put together driving directions with very different results. I picked a location forty miles from my home and simply asked each personal assistant to provide me with driving directions.

The response I received from Cortana was less than satisfactory for two reasons: 1) Cortana cut me off in mid query on two of my three attempts. Pauses appeared to be interpreted, incorrectly, as end-of-voice-query field delimiters. So the audible responses I received on both of these unsatisfactory results were wrong. The response to my third attempt to present the destination was even worse. Instead of receiving an audible reply, I was presented with a results page from Bing with a list of results, all of which were relevant to the location I was after, but, if I had been driving, would have been entirely useless. 2) When Cortana correctly understood my question, the app started the “Bing Here” mapping application, with its own voice response component. This is not necessarily a problem, but for the otherwise computer limited user (my wife is a good example of this type of person), the kind of seamlessly integrated response I received from “OK Google” to the same query would have been preferred.

It’s worth adding a bit to the above critique. There are likely to be a good set of voice commands sure to prompt Cortana to reply with an audible answer. I was not able to find them. When I attempted to start my direction query with “Navigate to” as per a command I found on the list at Cortana Commands List – Microsoft Voice Commands – Video, the reply I received was erroneous “navigate to 57th Street in Manhattan, between 6th and 7th Avenues” was intrepreted as “navigate 257th St. between sixth and 7th ave in Manhattan”. The results were served as a list of links, and, once again, Cortana wasn’t helping.

In contrast, “OK Google” correctly fielded a request phrased as “get directions to West 57th Street, Manhattan, NY” and replied, correctly, with an audible answer. What’s more, “OK Google” “spoke for” the Google Maps app in precisely the kind of seamless handshake needed for computer challenged users, as I mentioned above. As I will explore in the next post to this blog, the question of how best to serve up a seamless response to this type of query, and what a successful effort has to say about the usefulness of search across the set of apps someone happens be be using, is, in my opinion a big one.

Bottom line: I was better able to find a list of useful voice commands to produce the kind of audible reply I required for “OK Google” than was the case for Cortana. One would hope Microsoft will move to correct this issue and close the gap, at least as regards the list of commands one needs to use to elicit a desired audible response from Cortana.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

19
Mar

Intel’s Reference Design for 64-Bit Smart Phone and Tablet Computers Attracts Positive Reviews from Mobile World Congress, 2014

Intel hasn’t enjoyed much success in the mobile market for smart phones and tablets. But on February 24, 2014, in a press release titled “Intel Gaining in Mobile and Accelerating Internet of Things”, Intel announced the launch of its ” . . . 64-bit Intel(R) Atom(tm) processor for smart phones and tablets . . . ” (quote is an excerpt from the press release). A reference design of a smart phone built on this processor and board showed up at Mobile World Congress. This prototype, running the Android KitKat OS, was well received by reviewers at the conference.

One of the reviews, Intel Merrifield Smartphone Reference Design, was published by Mobilegeeks.de. on the same day the Intel® published the press release for the 64-bit Atom solution. On several occasions the Mobilegeeks reviewer notes what she takes to be a major improvement in the product (as compared with Motorola’s Razr i, I would suspect), specifically the shorter length of the phone, which permits one hand gaming. There are quite a number of these reviews online. I did not find any strongly negative comments on the reference design.

So, if the mobile community actually warms up to this platform, what’s the impact for Intel? In my opinion, a right answer will be, necessarily complex. It’s certainly a positive to have a well received reference design, but the announced list of OEMs (ASUS, Lenovo, Dell and Foxconn) for this chip solution, with the exception of Leonovo (and only as the result of its plan to acquire Motorola Mobilty from Google), have zero footprint in the consumer smart phone manufacturing market. In my opinion the absence of a leading smart phone manufacturer will be a very hard obstacle for Intel to overcome. The choice to build the reference design with an Android KitKat OS will likely exclude Nokia from the list of likely targets for the platform.

Therefore it makes sense to assume, perhaps, three quarters of minimal sales for this product line as a significant smart phone manufacturer comes to the surface. At the same time each of the announced OEMs offers several table computing products. Expect to see the 64-bit Atom chip solution, with the Android OS, popping up in some tablet designs.

But HP (conspicuously absent from the above list of OEMs) just released two tablets with the 64-bit Atom processor, BayTrail, running Microsoft® Windows 8.1. You can read a review of the tablet in an article published on the PC World web site, titled HP ships first 64-bit Windows 8.1 tablets with Intel Atom. So it’s clear tablet OEMs on the Windows OS side of the market are keen on the 64-bit Atom BayTrail cousin to this solution. These sales will likely ramp up faster, but for a smaller overall market (focused on business end users).

Disclaimer: I’m long Intel.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved