22
Sep

Cloud IaaS Becomes Accessible to SMBs with Limited In House Technical Expertise

An earlier post to this blog remarked on what then appeared to be a set of considerable technical hurdles facing small to medium sized businesses (SMBs) in the US considering a migration to cloud, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offers. But this writer recently identified technical communications pieces, published by Microsoft Azure and Amazon EC2, which may serve to lessen the challenge of these same hurdles.

WordPress is, arguably, the most popular blog platform available to consumers in the US. SMBs looking to launch an online content promotional effort can, and do implement new instances of WordPress every day. But while acquiring WordPress is a free-of-charge process, hosting one’s blog is not. One can argue hosting is also available, free-of-charge, on WordPress’ corporate (.com) site. But there is a cost to everything, so most SMBs will look to find a hosting partner, rather than give up the SEO equity in repayment for a tenancy on this corporate site. Conventional hosting isn’t cheap. So many SMBs consider partnering with a cloud, IaaS like Azure, or Amazon EC2 on the promise of substantial cost savings, as compared to conventional hosting resources.

In an online presentation titled How to host a Scalable and Optimized WordPress for Azure in minutes, Sunitha Muthukrishna, Program Manager, Azure Websites, provides a step-by-step procedure SMBs should be likely to easily follow. The short presentation includes a lot of imagery, which should make the process easier.

Amazon EC2 also offers documentation on the same task, titled Tutorial: Hosting a WordPress Blog with Amazon EC2, but the presentation is geared more for the technical user. Nevertheless, the objective is still the same, to encourage SMBs, and any other sized organization contemplating a move to cloud, IaaS for its blog, to overcome some of the technical intimidation of the process.

The Microsoft Azure piece is of particular interest as it is an example of Microsoft’s movement away from a parochial view of just which pieces of software ought to be supported on a Microsoft cloud. If this new, welcoming and expansive approach reverberates over a wider set of possible applications to be hosted on Azure, Microsoft should accelerate the sales pace for Azure.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved

21
Jul

Google May Come Up a Big Winner After All in the Cloud IaaS Market

Amazon AWS may be the largest cloud AWS provider, with Microsoft Azure a somewhat distant second, but Google’s Kubernetes may change all of that. This likelihood runs counter to an opinion of this writer, which provided the content of an earlier post to this blog.

The earlier post, titled Is Google’s Compute Engine (GCE) a Direct Competitor to AWS or Microsoft Azure? contended Google’s cloud, IaaS offer, Google Compute was an unlikely direct competitor to Microsoft® Azure, given its lack of direct support for Microsoft’s line of proprietary servers.

There is no indication of any changes to this status quo in an article written by Quentin Hardy and published to the New York Times Bits Blog. Rather, this blog post, titled Cloud Computing Giants Add to Open Source Credentials With Kubernetes presents an opportunity for Google’s efforts in this market of, potentially, much greater magnitude.

As Hardy notes, and Mary Jane Foley confirms in another article on this topic, this time published on ZDnet, Kubernete is Google’s effort to offer the very rich set of tools it has developed to support its Search and eMail products to the developer community via an Open Source approach.

If the initial list of committed partners — including IBM, Microsoft and Red Hat — simply add Kubernete to their lists of supported IaaS components, the rate at which users consume these tools may take on geometric proportion.

In the case of Azure, the Kubernete tool set, per Mary Jane Foley, will be made available within Azure’s lineup of IaaS components for Linux. Since Google search remains Google Search, with every implementation, more consumers will be exposed to Google products, including PPC advertising.

The benefit to Microsoft looks to be the opportunity Kubernete provides, which may transform Azure into a much more appealing solution than has been the case.

In turn, since Amazon AWS has expressed no interest in signing on, a clear differentiator will likely be created between Azure and Amazon AWS.

Ira Michael Blonder

© IMB Enterprises, Inc. & Ira Michael Blonder, 2014 All Rights Reserved